blog-header brought to you by Salesforce 13.png

Latest "Customer Service Culture" Posts

As most of you (hopefully) know, my latest book, The Convenience Revolution, is all about making the customer experience as frictionless as possible. In the book, there are six Convenience Principles with plenty of examples, and many of our followers have read my articles and watched my videos on these powerful concepts. The other day I was interviewed and asked, “How does one get started?” Continue reading

One of my favorite restaurants in St. Louis, where I live, is Tony’s. You may be familiar with Tony’s if you have been following my articles and videos for a while. They are an outstanding example of a great product – their food – and amazing service. So, good in fact that they are one of the businesses that don’t have to exceed expectations. They are so good at what they do, all they have to do is meet expectations to amaze their guests. Continue reading

Ten Ways To Recognize Employees During National Customer Service Week

National Customer Service Week Is About Customers AND Employees

Shep Hyken sits down with Bill Gessert to talk about National Customer Service Week (October 1-5, 2018). They discussed 10 ways to celebrate the week-long event, how to create an employee-centric culture, and how to get C-suite executives involved in the everyday culture.

Continue reading

There is an old saying: It is better to give than to receive. The interpretation of this is that giving is an act of kindness. There is another old saying: The more you give, the more you get. So, is the act of giving truly an act of kindness, even if you know you’ll receive something back, and even if you don’t know exactly what it is? I think so, especially if the act of giving has no strings attached – even if giving more means you get more, then it truly is an act of kindness. Continue reading

A potential client called for help. His plea was, “We are so NOT customer-focused, and we need to be!” He then shared what may be one of the most crystal-clear examples of the difference between a company that is customer focused and one that isn’t.

By the way, the name of the company has been “changed to protect the innocent,” as they say. We’ll refer to them as Company X. Continue reading

I’ve got good news and bad news for you. The good news is that you no longer have to keep up with your competition; the bad news is that now you have to keep up with your customer – meaning your customer’s expectation of the service that makes you competitive.

Perhaps you just heard that your competitor is working hard to take away business from you – maybe they’re announcing a new product; maybe they’re advertising a major sale; maybe they’re opening a new location. Will any of these decisions cause your customers to leave you to do business with them? Continue reading

Customer Service Begins with Accountability

How can accountability create Moments of Magic®?

Shep Hyken sits down with Sam Silverstein to discuss the importance of fostering a culture of accountability, which empowers employees to give truly amazing customer service.

Continue reading

The other day I was talking with a gentleman who was as passionate about customer service and experience as I am. He had worked with support centers and we were discussing how important the team in a customer support center is to an organization. Yet, it surprised both of us just how low paid some of these support people are.

That made me think about the teller at a bank, the person who is the “face” of the bank for all intents and purposes. They greet the customers, handle their money, and work directly with the customers – more than anyone else in the bank – yet it is typically one of the lower-paid positions.

Continue reading

Jeff Bezos, the CEO of Amazon, once said, “The best customer service is if the customer doesn’t need to call you, doesn’t need to talk to you. It just works.”

In other words, the best customer service is invisible. It just happens. The customer doesn’t have to ask for it. It just gets done the way it’s supposed to. What does get done isn’t always noticed, and shouldn’t be. Invisible service means it happens without you ever seeing it. Continue reading